Decisions

Use the search options below to find decisions. To access information prior to 2011 click here.

Alternatively you can view delegated decisions that have been taken by individual councillors in relation to council officers under the Scheme of Delegation to Officers:

Key Decision definition: A key decision means an executive decision which is likely:

(a) to result in the council incurring expenditure which is, or the making of savings which are significant having regard to the council's budget for the service or function which the decision relates; or

(b) to be significant in terms of its effects on communities living or working in an area comprising two or more wards or electoral divisions in the area of the council.

For the purposes of (a) above, the threshold for "significant" is £1.7 million.

Decisions

14/01/2021 - Housing Infrastructure Fund - South Lancaster Growth Catalyst ref: 18750    Recommendations Approved

A report on the Housing Infrastructure Fund.

Decision Maker: Cabinet

Decision published: 14/01/2021

Effective from: 20/01/2021

Decision:

The Cabinet approved the recommendation(s) as set out in the report.

Divisions affected: Lancaster Rural East;

Lead officer: Andrew Barrow, Steve Burns


14/01/2021 - Money Matters 2020/21 Position - Quarter 3 ref: 18741    Recommendations Approved

This report provides an update to Cabinet on the county council's 2020/21 revenue and capital financial position, as at the end of December 2020 and an updated Medium Term Financial Strategy covering the period 2021/22 to 2023/24.

 

There is ongoing and unprecedented uncertainty in relation to future local government funding and the financial impact of the COVID-19 emergency has exacerbated the problem.

 

Accordingly significant assumptions are required to underpin our forecasts. While these can be made with a level of confidence in the current year, over the medium term, with limited information, we rely heavily on advice from national bodies, benchmarking and discussion with peers.

 

Whilst a multi-year Spending Review was originally expected, the Chancellor and the Prime Minister decided to conduct a one-year Spending Review, setting department’s resource and capital budgets for 2021/22 only in order to prioritise the response to COVID-19 and focus on supporting jobs. The Medium Term Financial Strategy at quarter 3 reflects the provisional financial settlement which was announced on 17 December 2020. This provided confirmation of funding announcements made by the Chancellor as part of the Spending Review 2020, however these are subject to consultation and could change as part of the final financial settlement. This included the ability to raise additional council tax through a social care precept and additional funding to support the costs of the COVID-19 pandemic. These changes have had a significant impact on the forecast gap in 2021/22, however it must be noted that many of these changes are non-recurrent and it is likely that there will be longer term pressures within the budget due to the impact of COVID-19 which are difficult to quantify at this stage in the pandemic.

 

The settlement is for one year only and the figures are expected to be confirmed in late January/early February 2021 within the final settlement announcement.

 

Whilst the quarter 3 forecast presents anunderspend of £7.951m for the current financial year, there remains a level of uncertainty about the longer term impacts of the ongoing pandemic. There will certainly be ongoing impacts relating to the collection fund that force a pressure, currently estimated at £1.7m per annum, into the next three years.

 

Any latent impact on price or demand for our services also remains unclear.

 

The current Medium Term Financial Strategy indicates an aggregated funding gap of £53.956m by 2023/24, a decrease of £24.835m from the previously reported position.

 

In summary:

 

(i)  The 2020/21 revenue forecast outturn is £836.900m, representing a projected underspend of £7.951m (0.94%) of the agreed budget.

 

(ii)  The Medium Term Financial Strategy has been updated for our current expectations of levels of funding, savings delivery, demand and inflation.

 

(iii)At Cabinet in November 2020 the Medium Term Financial Strategy showed a deficit of £78.791m in 2023/24. The forecast now indicates a financial deficit of £53.956m by 2023/24.

 

(iv)The council is forecast to hold a General Reserve against unforeseen issues of £23.437m representing circa 3% of net budget, which is unchanged from the previously reported position. 

 

(v)  The council is forecast to hold £159.420m of uncommitted transitional reserve at the end of the financial year. This is sufficient to meet the forecast gap for all of the years covered by the Medium Term Financial Strategy, 2021/22 to 2023/24.

Decision Maker: Cabinet

Decision published: 14/01/2021

Effective from: 20/01/2021

Decision:

The Cabinet approved the recommendation(s) as set out in the report with the following amendment:

 

·  Recommendation (iv) in the report, be deferred to the next meeting of Cabinet on 4 February 2021.

Divisions affected: (All Divisions);

Lead officer: Neil Kissock, Kate Lee


14/01/2021 - Progress on the Implementation of the Procurement Process for Wennington Hall School and Proposal to Consult on the Discontinuance of the Local Authority's Maintenance of the School ref: 18747    Recommendations Approved

Approval was given to commence a formal procurement process intended to secure the future of Wennington Hall School in January 2020. The implementation of this decision was delayed due to the national pandemic and the invitation to tender published on 26 October 2020. The process for receipt of tenders closed on 4 December 2020.

 

The statutory process, set out in the School Organisation (Establishment and Discontinuance of Schools) Regulations 2013, must be undertaken before making a decision on the discontinuance of Wennington Hall School. Permission to pursue discontinuance has been given by the Department for Education on the condition that a suitable independent provider is identified.

Decision Maker: Cabinet

Decision published: 14/01/2021

Effective from: 20/01/2021

Decision:

The Cabinet approved the recommendation(s) as set out in the report.

Divisions affected: Lancaster Rural East;

Lead officer: Dave Carr


14/01/2021 - Where Our Children Live ref: 18748    Recommendations Approved

Lancashire has a well-regarded and high performing residential service for our most vulnerable children. However, it has been several years since this provision was last reviewed. Working across all the elements of residential provision and based on evidence and consultation this report proposes a change to the way we provide residential care.

 

Lancashire Education and Children's Services now have a strength based operating model known as Family Safeguarding. Supporting families to remain together and ensure that they receive care within the home, the benefits are that families can deal with their own issues more easily and become confident working alongside practitioners to find solutions to their needs. To support this new way of working, we must reshape our residential provision and purpose.

 

This report presents proposals to increase provision to support children to remain at home with support; to establish 2 reception units enabling better assessments of children in crisis, and to reconfigure the residential provision to enable Lancashire to care for more children and young people within the county boundary.

 

This is deemed to be a Key Decision and the provisions of Standing Order C19 have been complied with.

Decision Maker: Cabinet

Decision published: 14/01/2021

Effective from: 20/01/2021

Decision:

The Cabinet approved the recommendation(s) as set out in the report.

Lead officer: Sharon Hubber


14/01/2021 - Lancashire Safeguarding Adults Board - Annual Report 2019/20 ref: 18749    Recommendations Approved

This report is being presented to the Cabinet, prior to publication of the Lancashire Safeguarding Adults Board Annual Report for 2019/20. The draft Lancashire Safeguarding Adults Board Annual Report for 2019/20 is set out at Appendix 'A'.

Decision Maker: Cabinet

Decision published: 14/01/2021

Effective from: 20/01/2021

Decision:

The Cabinet approved the recommendation(s) as set out in the report.

Divisions affected: (All Divisions);

Lead officer: Laura Parkinson, Sarah Rahmat


14/01/2021 - Skid Resistance Code of Practice ref: 18744    Recommendations Approved

The maintenance of adequate levels of skidding resistance across Lancashire's highways is an important aspect of highway maintenance and one that contributes significantly to the safety of the highway network for all road users.

 

This report seeks approval to revise the Skid Resistance Code of Practice which sets out the county council's approach to monitoring skid resistance, interpreting data, investigating accident sites and developing an annual programme of remedial and/or resurfacing works across Lancashire's A, B & C road network.

Decision Maker: Cabinet

Decision published: 14/01/2021

Effective from: 20/01/2021

Decision:

The Cabinet approved the recommendation(s) as set out in the report.

Divisions affected: (All Divisions);

Lead officer: Paul Binks


14/01/2021 - Procurement Report ref: 18742    Recommendations Approved

In line with the county council's procurement rules, this report sets out a recommendation to approve the commencement of a procurement exercise for the provision of IT Hardware.

 

This is deemed to be a Key Decision and the requirements of Standing Order C19 have been complied with.

Decision Maker: Cabinet

Decision published: 14/01/2021

Effective from: 20/01/2021

Decision:

The Cabinet approved the recommendation(s) as set out in the report.

Divisions affected: (All Divisions);

Lead officer: Rachel Tanner


14/01/2021 - Residents Parking Schemes Revised Criteria ref: 18743    Recommendations Approved

The council is receiving increasing numbers of requests for residents parking schemes within the county. The present criteria for the introduction of these schemes was adopted 11 years ago.  Over the last several years, very few schemes have been introduced due to resource limitations.  More recently, the county council removed the offer of Residents Permit Parking Schemes as part of the Highways Service Delivery Plan (2015). Prior to considering re-starting the introduction of residents parking schemes it is prudent to revise the criteria to allow new schemes to be promoted where the need is the greatest.

 

This is deemed to be a Key Decision and the provisions of Standing Order C19 have been complied with.

Decision Maker: Cabinet

Decision published: 14/01/2021

Effective from: 20/01/2021

Decision:

The Cabinet approved the recommendation(s) as set out in the report.

Divisions affected: (All Divisions);

Lead officer: Chris Nolan, Tracey Price


14/01/2021 - Children Looked After Sufficiency Strategy 2021 - 2024 ref: 18746    Recommendations Approved

It is a legal requirement for all local authorities to provide a Children Looked After Sufficiency Strategy, as set out in Section 22G of the Children's Act 1989. The Strategy sets out how Lancashire County Council intends to meet its Sufficiency Duty for the children we look after, improve the quality and choice of placements, ensure value for money and minimise the likelihood of suitable placements not being available locally. 

 

This is deemed to be a Key Decision and the provisions of Standing Order C19 have been complied with.

Decision Maker: Cabinet

Decision published: 14/01/2021

Effective from: 20/01/2021

Decision:

The Cabinet approved the recommendation(s) as set out in the report.

Divisions affected: (All Divisions);

Lead officer: Annette McNeil


14/01/2021 - Schools Budget 2021/22 ref: 18745    Recommendations Approved

In accordance with the Government's school funding Regulations and Guidance, the Authority is required to submit a final Schools Block budget pro-forma for 2021/22 to the Education and Skills Funding Agency by 21 January 2021. This report seeks the approval of Cabinet to submit the Schools Block budget pro-forma and requests approval for the Early Years, High Needs and Central Schools Services Block budgets for 2021/22.

 

This is deemed to be a Key Decision and the provisions of Standing Order C19 have been complied with.

Decision Maker: Cabinet

Decision published: 14/01/2021

Effective from: 14/01/2021

Decision:

The Cabinet approved the recommendation(s) as set out in the report.

Divisions affected: (All Divisions);

Lead officer: Paul Bonser, Kevin Smith


18/12/2020 - Lancashire Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) Partnership - Update on the Accelerated Progress Plan ref: 18740    Recommendations Approved

Update report on the Lancashire Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) Partnership - Draft Accelerated Progress Plan.

Decision Maker: Lancashire Health and Wellbeing Board - SEND Sub-Committee

Made at meeting: 18/12/2020 - Lancashire Health and Wellbeing Board - SEND Sub-Committee

Decision published: 11/01/2021

Effective from: 18/12/2020

Decision:

Sarah Callaghan, Director of Education and Skills, Lancashire County Council, and Zoe Richards, Senior Programme Manager for SEND, Lancashire and South Cumbria and Hilary Fordham, Morecambe Bay Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), introduced the item.

 

It was noted that the first monitoring visit had taken place, as shown in the report and monthly reports would be produced for the Committee containing the progress made for each action since the last meeting of the Committee. The report for this meeting was in reference to progress made to the actions for October and November 2020

 

Each action in the report were taken in turn and members' provided comments to each action:

 

Action One: Leaders' Understanding of Local Area

 

In terms of Action One, the following key messages were noted:

 

  • Good progress had been made with regard to the leaders' understanding of the local area and that the new SEND Partnership Manager and Local Officer Development Officer posts, jointly funded by Lancashire County Council and the NHS, would both commence their employment on 4 January. 

 

  • A joint County Council/Health data team had been established and strong scrutiny and challenge processes are in place, including the data dashboard, which is currently being developed.  The Personal Outcomes Evaluation Tool (POET) survey had now been reviewed and the relevant action was being taken.  The survey Monkey Quiz was being developed and the agreed focus of support was in place.

 

  • A feedback mechanism would be piloted from January and most health providers within the Lancashire and South Cumbria footprint have engaged with the Data Quality Improvement Programme.

 

Members' requested that a key of the colours used for Red – Amber – Green (RAG) ratings should be included in the document, along with a glossary of abbreviations and terms. The report should also be amended to identify which key milestones referred to which of the particular priorities.

 

Action Two: Joint Commissioning

 

In terms of Action Two, the following key messages were noted:

 

  • A report had been sent to the Children and Young People's Commissioning Network, which looks at the strategic element of commissioning arrangements across Lancashire and South Cumbria, and a Lancashire Commissioning Group, which considers tactical arrangements particular to the county, have recently been convened.  School Nurse Practitioner Workshops had been held in November and December and the Special School Nursing Task Group had been reconvened. A review of Specialist Children's Nursing Services had also been completed, with parent and carers asked for feedback.  Continence policy arrangements had also been reviewed and would shortly be sent out to stakeholders.

 

  • All key milestones for this quarter are on target and progressing well but it was noted that the implications of the response to Covid-19 had made an impact on the commissioning capacity.

 

Action Three: Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Pathway

 

In terms of Action Three, the following key messages were noted:

 

  • All providers and Clinical Commissioning Groups had engaged in a recovery plan approach and a request for recovery plan funding had been made to the Integrated Care System for support for a whole system improvement plan for all local authorities within Lancashire.

 

  • Links had been made with the National Autism Team and the Autism Spectrum Disorder National Clinical Lead had undertaken a gap and demand analysis and feasibility study, the report for which is expected at the end of December 2021. 

 

  • A Neuro-Developmental (ND) Pathway Group to deliver the Autism Spectrum Disorder Project Plan across the Integrated Care System had been established in December 2019.  This Group has agreed that the Autism Spectrum Disorder Project Plan would be the priority for the duration of the Accelerated Progress Plan (APP) and an update would be provided at a future meeting of the SEND Sub-Committee.

 

  • It was reported that three of the key milestones had been completed, but there were concerns over not being able to appoint private sector Digital Assessors, the quality of output from private providers and data requirements not being met by private providers.

 

  • There were still key issues and gaps that remained which included the Neuro-Developmental (ND) Pathway Co-ordinators that had not yet been appointed, although it was noted that this should be resolved by January/February 2021. 

 

Following the presentation, the following were clarified:

 

  • That in relation to the response rate from parent carers regarding Autism Spectrum Disorder and Neuro-Developmental (ASD/ND) support, a 30% response rate should be achieved within the next three months, 50% within six months, with the final expectation being a 70% response rate.

 

 

  • Following a suggestion to invite the National Autism Spectrum Disorder Clinical Lead to the next meeting of the SEND Sub-Committee in order that they could present their report to the committee directly, members' were informed that their report information would be fed into a report that was to be presented to the SEND Partnership Board and a suggestion was made that members' of this Committee could be invited to that particular meeting.

 

  • Following a query regarding the red RAG rating around the quality of output from private providers and a request for assurance that there were not a backlog as a result of this, it was stated that a proposal will be developed by 4 January to include three different trajectories that would identify the impact on the delivery of the Accelerated Progress Plan. 

 

  • It was confirmed that Zoe Richards was taking the lead on communications and engagement and, in responding to a query, she confirmed that all Clinical Commissioning Groups are involved in the SEND agenda through the Children and Young People's Commissioning Group and there is a SEND Improvement Board for Health, to which all the SEND Commissioners from all the Clinical Commissioning Groups are invited to attend.

 

Action Four: Transitions in Health Care

 

In terms of Action Four, the following key messages were noted:

 

  • All health care providers have engaged with transition in health care and SEND Improvement Groups had been established in several providers and other providers setting up SEND Improvement Groups, early in the New Year.

 

  • The key milestones are all on target and the main risk was the engagement of Adult Services.  Data requirements were also identified as a risk but this is being addressed and an update will be provided at the next meeting.  It was also noted that the response to the Covid-19 pandemic is a risk in terms of ensuring that everything is in place in the timescales required.

 

Responding to a concern over the target of achieving the 45% positive feedback from children and young people regarding their transition process, members' were informed that a benchmarking exercise on transition arrangements in health care had taken place prior to the Accelerated Progress Plan (APP) being in place.

 

Action Five: Local Offer

 

In terms of Action Five, the following key messages were noted:

 

  • The Local Offer Development Officer will take up employment on 4 January. Their role included developing the local offer website and the ways in which local offers are made available across Lancashire. 

 

  • A soft launch of the local offer directory of service had taken place and a decision to renew the open object software licence had been taken. This would enable the directory to be in place.  A feedback form had been uploaded onto the website.

 

  • Three of the four milestones were on target, with the directory of services being addressed in the New Year.

 

Following the presentation, member's requested the following:

 

  • The minutes from the SEND Partnership Board be sent around the Committee, as the minutes published to the website were not up-to-date.

 

  • The monitoring feedback from the Department of education / NHS England and NHS Improvement (DfE/NHS EI) be seen by the Committee. However, in response to this request, members' were informed that feedback was given both verbally and formally, with formal feedback being received in March and September.

 

Concerns were also raised the possibilities of equality impact assessments not being undertaken as services evolved. In response, members' were informed that should significant changes to the services take place, equality impact assessments would be carried out by the commissioners, with any major changes being taken through the formal relevant governance processes.

 

Resolved: That;

 

i.  The progress of the Accelerated Progress Plan (APP) to date on the five areas of concern, including those areas highlighted in 'red' or 'amber, be noted;

ii.  That the highlight report be amended to include a key of the colours used for the RAG ratings, a glossary of abbreviations and terms, and a section to identify which key milestones refer to which particular priority;

iii.  The report that was sent to the Children and Young People's Commissioning Network, to be circulated to Committee members for their information;

  1. The National Autism Team work streams would be circulated to members of the Committee;
  2. The possibilities of members' being invited to attend the SEND Partnership Board, be investigated; and
  3. The minutes from the previous meetings of the SEND Partnership Board be sent to the Committee.

Divisions affected: (All Divisions);

Lead officer: Sarah Callaghan


06/01/2021 - Co-ordinated Admissions Scheme 2022/2023 - Determination of the Qualifying Scheme

This report outlines the timetable which will be used for the admissions round in 2022/23. This allows the County to be compliant with the requirements of the Schools Admission Code.

Decision Maker: Cabinet

Decision due date: 04/02/2021

Divisions affected: (All Divisions);

Lead officer: Nan Hogg, Debbie Ormerod

Notice of decision: 06/01/2021

Anticipated restriction: Part I


06/01/2021 - Determination of Relevant Area for Consultation on Admission Arrangements for Lancashire Maintained Schools and Academies for Academic Years 2023/24; 2024/25 and 2025/26

Regulations require each Local Authority to define a 'relevant area' in which admission authorities must consult annually on their proposed admission arrangements.

The relevant area for consultation with other admission authorities has been defined as the administrative district in which the school is located. In addition, any admission authority which was within three miles of a secondary school and two miles of a primary school was also included. This included schools near an administrative border, whether or not they were in another administrative district of Lancashire or within another local authority area.

Decision Maker: Cabinet

Decision due date: 04/02/2021

Divisions affected: (All Divisions);

Lead officer: Nan Hogg, Debbie Ormerod

Notice of decision: 06/01/2021

Anticipated restriction: Part I


06/01/2021 - School Place Provision Strategy 2021 to 2026

The School Place Provision Strategy 2021 to 2026 replaces the School Place Provision Strategy 2017/18 to 2019/20, which was last published in 2017.

Decision Maker: Cabinet

Decision due date: 04/03/2021

Divisions affected: (All Divisions);

Lead officer: Steph Rhodes

Notice of decision: 06/01/2021

Anticipated restriction: Part I


06/01/2021 - Lancashire County Council (Various Roads, Wyre Borough Area) (Revocation and Introduction of Parking Places) Order 202* and Supporting Parking Restrictions Order

Proposal for introduction of Coastal Pay and Display on The Esplanade, Fleetwood and Rossall Promenade & South Promenade, Thornton-Cleveleys along with evening car only parking and supporting parking restrictions.

Decision Maker: Cabinet

Decision due date: 10/06/2021

Divisions affected: Fleetwood East; Fleetwood West & Cleveleys West; Wyre Rural Central;

Lead officer: Chris Nolan, Tracey Price

Notice of decision: 06/01/2021

Anticipated restriction: Part I


06/01/2021 - Determination of Home to School Transport Policy - Academic Year 2022/2023

Mainstream Home to School Transport Policy for the 2022/23 Academic Year.

Decision Maker: Cabinet

Decision due date: 04/02/2021

Divisions affected: (All Divisions);

Lead officer: Nan Hogg, Debbie Ormerod

Notice of decision: 06/01/2021

Anticipated restriction: Part I


06/01/2021 - Determination of Admission Arrangements for Community and Voluntary Controlled Primary and Secondary Schools and Sixth Forms for the School Year 2022/2023

This report contains the admission number, oversubscription criteria and admission arrangements for Lancashire's Primary and Secondary Schools.

Decision Maker: Cabinet

Decision due date: 04/02/2021

Lead officer: Nan Hogg, Debbie Ormerod

Notice of decision: 06/01/2021

Anticipated restriction: Part I


06/01/2021 - Capital Strategy for Schools - 2018/19 to 2021/22

This report sets out the proposals for the allocation of schools capital funding to address a further phase of high priority building condition repairs on Community,Voluntary Controlled and Maintained Schools in Lancashire.

Decision Maker: Cabinet

Decision due date: 04/02/2021

Divisions affected: (All Divisions);

Lead officer: Simon Smith, Sarah Welch

Notice of decision: 06/01/2021

Anticipated restriction: Part II


06/01/2021 - Lancashire County Council (Various Roads, Fylde Borough Area) (Revocation and Introduction of Parking Places) Order 202* and Supporting Parking Restrictions Order

Proposal to introduce Coastal Pay & Display Parking in Lytham-St-Annes and a proposal introducing evening Car Only Parking along with supporting parking restrictions.

Decision Maker: Cabinet

Decision due date: 10/06/2021

Divisions affected: Fylde East; Lytham; St Annes North; St Annes South;

Lead officer: Chris Nolan, Tracey Price

Notice of decision: 06/01/2021

Anticipated restriction: Part I


06/01/2021 - Adult Social Care - Fees and Charges 2021/2022

This report sets out the county council's proposed fee uplifts for adult social care providers for 2021/22.

Decision Maker: Cabinet

Decision due date: 04/02/2021

Divisions affected: (All Divisions);

Lead officer: Michael Alsop

Notice of decision: 06/01/2021

Anticipated restriction: Part I


06/01/2021 - Procurement Report

In line with the council's procurement rules Cabinet is asked to approve the commencement of a procurement exercises in relation to:
(i) Safer Roads Scheme
(ii) Vehicle Restraint Systems

(iii) South Lancaster HIF programme

Decision Maker: Cabinet

Decision due date: 04/02/2021

Divisions affected: (All Divisions);

Lead officer: Rachel Tanner

Notice of decision: 06/01/2021

Anticipated restriction: Part I


06/01/2021 - Provision of Secondary School Places in Burnley

Provision of additional secondary school places in Burnley district.

Decision Maker: Cabinet

Decision due date: 04/03/2021

Divisions affected: Burnley Central East; Burnley Central West; Burnley North East; Burnley Rural; Burnley South West;

Lead officer: Mark Sarjent

Notice of decision: 06/01/2021

Anticipated restriction: Part I


06/01/2021 - M6 Junction 33 Reconfiguration with Link Road and Lancaster City Movement and Public Realm Strategy

A decision on the M6 Junction 33 reconfiguration and link road preferred option. A decision on options to be taken forward for further consultation through the Lancaster City Movement and Public Realm Strategy.

Decision Maker: Cabinet

Decision due date: 04/02/2021

Divisions affected: Lancaster Central; Lancaster Rural East; Lancaster South East;

Lead officer: Niamh O'Sullivan

Notice of decision: 06/01/2021

Anticipated restriction: Part I


06/01/2021 - Review and Redesign of Lancashire's Short Break Offer for Children and Young People with Disabilities

This report provides an update to Cabinet regarding the public consultation into the proposals for Lancashire's Short Break offer, following the Cabinet decision on 12 March 2020. The report sets out the final recommendations in relation to the delivery of a redesigned Short Break Offer that will enable the county council to fulfil its statutory responsibilities in relation to the sufficiency of provision of short breaks for children and young people with disabilities, and their parents and carers.

Decision Maker: Cabinet

Decision due date: 04/03/2021

Divisions affected: (All Divisions);

Lead officer: Fiona Harris, Dr Sally Richardson

Notice of decision: 06/01/2021

Anticipated restriction: Part I


24/09/2020 - Lancashire Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) Partnership - Draft Accelerated Progress Plan ref: 18735    Recommendations Approved

To consider the draft Accelerated Progress Plan

Decision Maker: Lancashire Health and Wellbeing Board - SEND Sub-Committee

Made at meeting: 24/09/2020 - Lancashire Health and Wellbeing Board - SEND Sub-Committee

Decision published: 04/01/2021

Effective from: 24/09/2020

Decision:

Sarah Callaghan, Director of Education and Skills, Lancashire County Council, and Zoe Richards, SEND Partnership Improvement Lead, Morecambe Bay Clinical Commissioning Group, introduced the item.

 

Sarah Callaghan reported that the Lancashire local area Special Educational Needs and Disabilities Services had been inspected by Ofsted and the Care Quality Commission (CQC) in November 2017 to judge how effectively the Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) reforms had been implemented, as per the Children and Families Act 2014. 

 

The inspection identified twelve areas of significant concern and a subsequent inspection revisit was therefore undertaken in March 2020 to see if sufficient progress had been made in these twelve areas.  The second inspection revisit confirmed that sufficient progress had been made in seven of the twelve areas but that further work was required in the remaining five, which are noted below.

 

  Leaders had an inaccurate understanding of the local area;

  there were weak joint commissioning arrangements that were not well developed or evaluated;

  there was an absence of effective diagnostic pathways for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) across the local area and no diagnostic pathway in the north of the area;

  transition arrangements in 0-25 healthcare services were poor; and

  the local offer was inaccessible and the quality of information published was poor.

 

In view of this, a draft Accelerated Improvement Plan has been put together for Lancashire, which focusses on these five areas for improvement.  The Plan will be formally monitored, with progress reports being made to both the SEND Partnership Board and the Lancashire Health and Wellbeing Board, along with further reviews by the Department for Education and NHS England.  It was noted that the final working draft of the Plan must be submitted to the Department for Education and NHS England by 30 September 2020.

 

Sarah Callaghan and Zoe Richards summarised the Plan, talking about each area of concern individually and the key performance indictators that have been put in place to counter-act those issues.

 

In response to a query about best practice in developing the action plan and how service users have been engaged in this process, it was reported that service users sit on both the SEND Partnership Board and SEND Operational Group and rigorously challenge actions and progress and shape the development plans for the Accelerated Progress Plan.

 

In addition, engaging with service users had taken place by engagement co-production and co-delivery and was working very well.  With regard to overall improvement of the service, plans were in place to determine how engagement with service users can be further improved by using several different mechanisms; ie, undertaking surveys, having virtual meetings and by liaising with schools to ask children for their opinions on their experiences of services by incorporating this into lessons.  In terms of best practice with regard to Autism Spectrum Disorder, benchmarking had taken place with other areas and meetings have taken place with the newly established National Autism Team, who are keen to have a joint co-learning process.

 

With regard to improving the 0-25 transition in healthcare services, after liaising with regional and national colleagues with similar complexities, the advice received was to have an ICS vision that fits in with the preparing for adulthood approach and to have an ICP delivery mechanism that is monitored and delivered at a local level.  The North West Transition Lead is also providing support in preparing the project plan.

 

In response to a query on the definition of the SEND offer and representation of the needs of children and young people on the Parent/Carer Forum, it was stated that whilst the Accelerated Progress Plan focusses on the five areas of concern, it was equally important to continue to support the objectives of the broader SEND strategy.  It was felt that representation on the Parent/Carer Forum in terms of complexity and diversity of need is good, with different sets of parents sitting on the SEND Partnership Board and the SEND Operational Group.  In addition, separate groups are consulted for feedback and surveys are sent out to parents and carers. 

 

With regard to a question regarding the monitoring process and timescales of the local offer, it was confirmed that a tool has been developed and should be implemented by October 2020, which will enable parents/carers to share their views about the local offer and allow findings to be analysed by the whole Partnership.  It was reported that the post of the Local Offer Development Officer was currently being advertised and that this post-holder would further develop the local offer website as well as undertaking broader communication and engagement, allowing service users to find information in a range of ways that are both timely and easily accessible.

 

Several queries were raised on the key performance indicators, the responses to which are outlined below:

 

Key performance indicators need to be ambitious and realistic but targets need to be constantly reviewed to see if baselines are being met and, if targets are not sufficiently aspirational, then more challenging work should be done.

 

In terms of the range and span of parent/carer feedback, projects are in place to address this, ie POET survey, but consideration needs to be given to obtaining feedback in more different and innovative ways.  Young people sit on the SEND Partnership Board and have a strong involvement in meetings and, going forward, it was recently agreed that all reports presented to the SEND Partnership Board should include reference to how children and young people's lives will be improved in such a way that shows they have been consulted.  Additionally, work will be done to obtain feedback by way of case studies, which will identify both areas of success and those in need of improvement.

 

The Sub-Committee discussed the key performance indictor target where 75% of 14 year olds requiring transition are actually identified and given a transition plan and that clarity on identifying those individuals would be required. Following a short discussion around managing transition arrangements and identifying individual children and young people, it was stated that the project plan should be presented in the context of the existing position and that the commissioning gap should be properly managed and linked to the action plan.

 

In terms of completing and implementing the directory of services and the sequencing of dates, it was confirmed that the actions in the directory of services will remain under constant review whilst the impact of the local offer will continue to be monitored and extended, in parallel, as a more developed piece of work.

 

The following next steps were noted:

 

  The Accelerated Progress Plan be submitted to the Department for Education and NHS England by 30 September 2020;

  the Department for Education and NHS England would continue to monitor the five areas where insufficient progress has been made; and

  formal monitoring would take place within six months and twelve months, from 1 October 2020.

 

Resolved:

 

i.  The receipt of the report from Ofsted and the Care Quality Commission following the joint inspection revisit be noted; and

 

ii.  the draft Accelerated Progress Plan which addresses the five areas of concern be considered and approved.

Divisions affected: (All Divisions);

Lead officer: Craig Alker


17/11/2020 - Universal Credit: Citizens Advice in Lancashire - the impact of Covid 19 ref: 18734    For Determination

A presentation from representatives of Citizens Advice in Lancashire on the impact of Covid 19 and Universal Credit.

Decision Maker: External Scrutiny Committee

Made at meeting: 17/11/2020 - External Scrutiny Committee

Decision published: 04/01/2021

Effective from: 17/11/2020

Decision:

The Chair welcomed to the meeting from Citizens Advice Rossendale and Hyndburn, Rachel Whippy, Chief Officer and Jenny Duthie, Universal Credit Help and Claim Best Practice Lead.

 

The committee was presented with an update on the impact of Covid 19 on the people of Lancashire and the issues they faced.

 

The following points were clarified:

 

·  On whether there had been an increase in domestic abuse issues during the pandemic, it was reported that there had been 179 reported issues in 2019 and this had increased to 239 in 2020. Anecdotally Citizens Advice advisors were reporting an increase in the number of referrals for relationship issues and this was echoed nationally.

·  Concerns were raised about loan shark activity. Members were informed that there was a government funded organisation for stopping loan sharks. Members were provided with a link to the 'Stop Loan Sharks' website: www.stoploansharks.co.uk . Stop Loan Sharks worked closely with Trading Standards. Credit Unions were also proactive in helping people get out of the grip of loan sharks. Solutions were available for people with debts under £20k were they could obtain a Debt Relief Order. It was stated that people should contact Citizens Advice for help in dealing with their debts and setting up dent management plans.

·  On how the county council might help support residents, it was felt the community hubs established during the pandemic were a good example of local authorities, health and the voluntary sector working together in partnership and it was hoped this would continue. In terms of service delivery for Citizens Advice it was noted that whilst capacity was reserved for the most vulnerable in society and those with complex issues, their approach was to help enable people to support themselves by providing a wealth of information and resources through its website and training on how to use it.

·  It was noted that the Citizens Advice did not work with trade unions but this could be an option.

·  It was suggested that Lancashire County council could advertise for volunteers for the Citizens Advice.

·  The Chair reminded the committee that a formal written response to its recommendations made in February 2020 was awaited from the Cabinet Member for Health and Wellbeing. It was felt that the committee should wait for the Cabinet Member's response before making recommendations.

 

Resolved: That;

 

1.  The report be noted.

2.  The External Scrutiny Committee awaits receipt of the formal written responses by the Cabinet Member for Health and Wellbeing before formulating any further recommendations.

 

Divisions affected: (All Divisions);

Lead officer: Gary Halsall


17/11/2020 - Decarbonisation pathway for Lancashire ref: 18733    For Determination

A presentation by representatives of Electricity North West and Cadent Gas on a decarbonisation pathway for Lancashire.

Decision Maker: External Scrutiny Committee

Made at meeting: 17/11/2020 - External Scrutiny Committee

Decision published: 04/01/2021

Effective from: 17/11/2020

Decision:

The Chair welcomed to the meeting from Electricity North West, Cara Blockley, Central Services Manager, Steve Cox, Engineering and Technical Director and Helen Norris, Stakeholder Engagement and Responsibility Framework Manager. From Cadent Gas the Chair welcomed Helen Boyle, Regional Development Manager.

 

The committee was provided with a presentation on the decarbonisation pathway for Lancashire. Lancashire was currently set to achieve carbon neutrality by 2050. The pathway provided a view on how its energy system could be decarbonised through a balanced use of renewable electricity and low carbon gas. The presentation aimed to show which technologies would emerge as commercially viable first and were therefore likely to be adopted by customers.

 

The following points were highlighted:

 

  • By 2050 Lancashire would rely on electricity imports from the National Grid and would be a net-importer of hydrogen. The majority of energy consumed in 2050 would be from electricity and hydrogen. Due to Lancashire's onshore and offshore wind potential, more than half of the electricity demand could be met with local distribution level generation. Abundant wind resources could also be used to generate significant amounts of green hydrogen by 2050.

·  On the installation of charging points for electric vehicles and the difficulties for people who lived in terraced houses or apartment blocks it was noted that from national trials people charged their vehicles in different places not just at home. Electricity North West had provided charging points (13 amp plugs) at its offices for staff to charge their vehicles at no additional cost to help incentivise the take up of electric vehicles. Whilst it would cost approx. 4 pence per mile to charge each vehicle, it was highlighted that it would cost more to meter such provision. Vehicles could be charged at around ten miles per hour on a 13 Amp plug. Electricity North West was encouraging employers in Lancashire to provide slow low trickle charging facilities for employees in their car parks. All major supermarkets were installing fast charging facilities. Large fuel stations were also providing ultra-fast chargers which would fully charge an average vehicle in around 15 minutes. It was explained that people were anxious about electric vehicle charging and running out of power however it was highlighted that most people used their vehicles for short distances and the way to solve this problem would be to install as many chargers at places of work, supermarkets, fuel stations and surface/multi-storey car parks as possible. Home charging was not an essential part of owning an electric vehicle.

·  Further detail was sought on the storage of hydrogen in salt caverns. It was explained that there were lots of trials happening around the country regarding this to answer a number of questions on hydrogen and the safety of storage. One such trial was being undertaken at Keele University[1] where they were now looking to implement 100% hydrogen supply for commercial and residential settings. Cadent Gas and other companies were looking at networked hydrogen and the supply chain. It was highlighted that Cadent Gas was not advocating hydrogen as the only solution, but a mixture of sources of energy generation.

·  On the development of tidal and river based generation it was pointed out that the roll out of such technology might depend on the price point versus the next generation of wind turbines or solar cells. Whilst there had been mixed success around the world for tidal and river based generation in particular large single point developments, the issue was the price per unit produced over the long term and this was the challenge for nuclear power and large scale civil engineering projects such as tidal. Organisations would be committing energy customers to a higher price in order to recover capital costs. However the technology would not be excluded from contributing to energy generation for the area.

·  It was highlighted that the price point for electric vehicles was dropping. For instance the whole lifetime operating costs for mini excavators was less than a diesel or petrol powered digger as well as having no noise and no carbon dioxide emissions. The problem was that very few people knew of these vehicles and the amount of information and leadership to businesses in the North West region on decarbonisation and low carbon technology was felt to be insufficient. This was one area Electricity North West wished to work with the committee and local authorities across the region on. Around 60-65% of all energy used in the region was by businesses and commerce and they were the primary target for switching their fleets to electric vehicles and moving their heat demand on to hydrogen. Public education campaigns and outreach programmes for businesses were crucial to help enable people to understand the opportunities available to them.

·  It was reported that a number of organisations in the Ellesmere Port area had come together and established the HyNet North West Consortium[2] in order to develop a supply chain for hyrodgen. Lancashire's solution for hydrogen would likely come from HyNet.

·  It was suggested that Lancashire County Council should provide leadership on decarbonisation and to consider ways to incentivise take up of low carbon technology. Decarbonising its own operations and publishing what works was all part of what would be considered as a central leadership role for the county council.

·  Electricity North West was hoping to move its fleet to electric vehicles with the exception of 4WD and heavy goods vehicles within the next 7 years. The latter would increasingly convert to hydrogen, but they were not commercially available to buy yet. 

 

It was felt that the process of decarbonisation as presented by Electricity North West and Cadent Gas, was progressive, comprehensive and stimulating, giving a true path towards a carbon free future for Lancashire. It was also felt there were a number of opportunities to progress this project both for the public and private sectors, particularly as Lancashire had significant resources and might even be able to supply the rest of the UK.

 

The chair reminded the committee from his rapporteur activities that there was no coordination of effort at a time when strong leadership was required. Some District Councils were quoted as looking to Lancashire County Council to prompt, advise and take a lead on decarbonisation. It was therefore;

 

Resolved: That relevant officers be requested to attend a future scheduled meeting of the External Scrutiny Committee to present on the Greater Lancashire Plan and progress made towards a green summit for Lancashire as previously agreed with the Cabinet Member for Economic Development, Environment and Planning to bring together all councils, public sector, the Lancashire Enterprise Partnership and the private sector into a cohesive, planned effort.

 



[1] HyDeploy green energy trial at Keele University: https://hydeploy.co.uk/ 

[2] HyNet North West Consortium website: https://hynet.co.uk/

Divisions affected: (All Divisions);

Lead officer: Gary Halsall


17/12/2020 - Exclusion of Press and Public ref: 18716    Recommendations Approved

Decision Maker: Full Council

Made at meeting: 17/12/2020 - Full Council

Decision published: 22/12/2020

Effective from: 17/12/2020

Decision:

County Councillor Geoff Driver moved a proposal to exclude the press and public from the meeting for the consideration of agenda item 11.

 

Resolved: - That the press and public be excluded from the meeting during consideration of the following item of business on the grounds that there would be a likely disclosure of exempt information as defined in the appropriate paragraph of Part 1 of Schedule 12A to the Local Government Act 1972, as indicated against the heading to the item.

 


17/12/2020 - Report of the Pension Fund Committee - Extension of Appointment of the Independent Chair of the Lancashire Local Pension Board ref: 18718    Recommendations Approved

A recommendation from the Pension Fund Committee for full council to approve a 2 year extension to the existing contact of appointment of the independent chair of the Lancashire Local Pension Board.

Decision Maker: Full Council

Made at meeting: 17/12/2020 - Full Council

Decision published: 22/12/2020

Effective from: 17/12/2020

Divisions affected: None;

Lead officer: Mike Neville


17/12/2020 - To consider Notices of Motion Submitted under Standing Order B36 ref: 18717    Recommendations Approved

Decision Maker: Full Council

Made at meeting: 17/12/2020 - Full Council

Decision published: 22/12/2020

Effective from: 17/12/2020

Decision:

1.  It was moved by County Councillor Lizzi Collinge and seconded by County Councillor Erica Lewis that:

 

Full Council, having in February 2019 recognised the need for urgent action on climate change, welcomes the publication of the recommendations of the Lancaster district Climate Change People’s Jury.

 

The question considered by the Lancaster district Climate Change People’s Jury was ‘What do we need to do in our homes, neighbourhoods and district to respond to the emergency of climate change?’

 

The report, published on 23 November 2020, makes recommendations across four areas of action:

 

?  Communications, Education And Council Leadership

?  Food/Farming And Waste/Recycling

?  Housing

?  Transport

 

The report can be viewed at:http://www.lancaster.gov.uk/sites/climate-emergency/people-s-jury-recommendations

 

This council commits to:

 

(i)  Understanding which recommendations are directly under the control of the county council.

(ii)  Understanding which recommendations are within the county council sphere of influence, whether directly or indirectly.

(iii)Implementing the recommendations where we have direct control.

(iv)Making actions plans on how to influence others to implement the rest of the recommendations.

(v)  Enacting those action plans.

 

The following friendly amendment was proposed by County Councillor Michael Green in accordance with Standing Order B42:

 

Full Council, having in February 2019 recognised the need for urgent action on climate change, welcomes the publication of the recommendations of the Lancaster district Climate Change People’s Jury. The question considered by the Lancaster district Climate Change People’s Jury was ‘What do we need to do in our homes, neighbourhoods and district to respond to the emergency of climate change?’ The report, published on 23 November 2020, makes recommendations across four areas of action:

 

  Communications, Education And Council Leadership

  Food/Farming And Waste/Recycling

  Housing

  Transport

The report can be viewed at: http://www.lancaster.gov.uk/sites/climate-emergency/people-s-jury-recommendations

 

This council commits to:

 

  1. Understanding which recommendations are directly under the control of the county council.
  2. Understanding which recommendations are within the county council sphere of influence, whether directly or indirectly.
  3. Assessing how the county council can best respond to the recommendations of the Jury, particularly in the context of the recommendations that will emerge from the work on carbon assessment and pathways to net zero for Lancashire.

 

The friendly amendment was accepted by County Councillor Collinge and became the substantive motion.

 

The substantive motion, as amended by County Councillor Green's friendly amendment, was then put to the vote and was CARRIED. It was therefore:

 

Resolved: - That:

 

Full Council, having in February 2019 recognised the need for urgent action on climate change, welcomes the publication of the recommendations of the Lancaster district Climate Change People’s Jury. The question considered by the Lancaster district Climate Change People’s Jury was ‘What do we need to do in our homes, neighbourhoods and district to respond to the emergency of climate change?’ The report, published on 23 November 2020, makes recommendations across four areas of action:

 

  Communications, Education And Council Leadership

  Food/Farming And Waste/Recycling

  Housing

  Transport

 

The report can be viewed at: http://www.lancaster.gov.uk/sites/climate-emergency/people-s-jury-recommendations

 

This council commits to:

 

  1. Understanding which recommendations are directly under the control of the county council.
  2. Understanding which recommendations are within the county council sphere of influence, whether directly or indirectly.
  3. Assessing how the county council can best respond to the recommendations of the Jury, particularly in the context of the recommendations that will emerge from the work on carbon assessment and pathways to net zero for Lancashire.

 

 

2.  It was moved by County Councillor Azhar Ali and seconded by County Councillor David Whipp that:

 

Lancashire County Council notes that Rolls-Royce sites at Barnoldswick contribute £1 billion to the region's GDP and that the company has received hundreds of millions of pounds from the government to support research and development in order to support British jobs.

 

Lancashire County Council notes with great concern that the company has announced it is offshoring British jobs to Singapore with the loss of wide-chord fan blade production and has now announced the loss of jobs from Barnoldswick to Spain. 

 

If Rolls-Royce implements these decisions in full, little more than one hundred people will be left at the birthplace of the jet engine at Barnoldswick site, down from over 1,000 just a few years ago. This will have an immediate and devastating impact on the supply chain and wider economy of the county and, in the longer term, lead to the loss of advanced manufacturing capabilities and skilled job opportunities. 

 

This Council expresses solidarity with the generations of skilled workers at the Barnoldswick sites since the jet engine was developed there, the current workforce, their families, and the wider community suffering so badly as a result of the company’s actions and Government’s inaction and instructs the Chief Executive as a matter of urgency:

 

(i)  To write to the Prime Minister asking for the government to immediately intervene in this misguided decision by Rolls Royce to shut down large parts of its operation on its Barnoldswick site in Pendle which affects the strategic capabilities of the country as a whole.

(ii)  To ask the Prime Minister for a meeting with group leaders, Unite the Union, Chair of the Lancashire LEP and the Chief Executive of Rolls Royce.

(iii)To write to Ben Walllace  as Secretary of State for Defence to request consideration of ways in which defence contracts could be transferred to Barnoldswick to utilise the world class skills of the engineers at the site, and a meeting with group leaders and Unite the Union.

(iv)To ask all Lancashire MPs to actively support the Battle for Barnoldswick campaign.

 

The following friendly amendment was proposed by County Councillor Geoff Driver in accordance with Standing Order B42:

Lancashire County Council notes that Rolls-Royce sites at Barnoldswick contribute £1 billion to the region's GDP and that the company has received hundreds of millions of pounds from the government to support research and development in order to support British jobs.

Lancashire County Council notes with great concern that the company has announced it is offshoring British jobs to Singapore with the loss of wide-chord fan blade production and has now announced the loss of jobs from Barnoldswick to Spain. 

If Rolls-Royce implements these decisions in full, little more than one hundred people will be left at the birthplace of the jet engine at Barnoldswick site, down from over 1,000 just a few years ago. This will have an immediate and devastating impact on the supply chain and wider economy of the county and, in the longer term, lead to the loss of advanced manufacturing capabilities and skilled job opportunities. 

This Council expresses solidarity with the generations of skilled workers at the Barnoldswick sites since the jet engine was developed there, the current workforce, their families, and the wider community suffering so badly as a result of the company’s actions and resolves that the Chief Executive and Director of Resources should:

 

(i)  Write to the Prime Minister:

(a)  Requesting government intervention in the decision by Rolls Royce to shut down large parts of its operation on the Barnoldswick site.

(b)  Requesting a meeting with Council leaders, Union representatives and Rolls Royce senior management to consider possible alternative courses of action and possible measures to mitigate the impact of these proposals on the workforce and the wider economy.

(ii)  Write to Ben Wallace MP, Secretary of State for Defence, requesting that consideration be given to defence contracts being awarded to the Barnoldswick site to utilise the world class skills of the engineers employed there.

(iii)  Write to all Lancashire MPs asking them to actively support the 'Battle for Barnoldswick' campaign.

 

The friendly amendment was accepted by County Councillor Ali and became the substantive motion.

 

The substantive motion, as amended by County Councillor Driver's friendly amendment, was then put to the vote and was CARRIED. It was therefore:

 

Resolved: - That:

Lancashire County Council notes that Rolls-Royce sites at Barnoldswick contribute £1 billion to the region's GDP and that the company has received hundreds of millions of pounds from the government to support research and development in order to support British jobs.

Lancashire County Council notes with great concern that the company has announced it is offshoring British jobs to Singapore with the loss of wide-chord fan blade production and has now announced the loss of jobs from Barnoldswick to Spain. 

If Rolls-Royce implements these decisions in full, little more than one hundred people will be left at the birthplace of the jet engine at Barnoldswick site, down from over 1,000 just a few years ago. This will have an immediate and devastating impact on the supply chain and wider economy of the county and, in the longer term, lead to the loss of advanced manufacturing capabilities and skilled job opportunities. 

This Council expresses solidarity with the generations of skilled workers at the Barnoldswick sites since the jet engine was developed there, the current workforce, their families, and the wider community suffering so badly as a result of the company’s actions and resolves that the Chief Executive and Director of Resources should:

 

(i)  Write to the Prime Minister:

(a)  Requesting government intervention in the decision by Rolls Royce to shut down large parts of its operation on the Barnoldswick site.

(b)  Requesting a meeting with Council leaders, Union representatives and Rolls Royce senior management to consider possible alternative courses of action and possible measures to mitigate the impact of these proposals on the workforce and the wider economy.

(ii)  Write to Ben Wallace MP, Secretary of State for Defence, requesting that consideration be given to defence contracts being awarded to the Barnoldswick site to utilise the world class skills of the engineers employed there.

(iii)  Write to all Lancashire MPs asking them to actively support the 'Battle for Barnoldswick' campaign.

 

County Councillor Gina Dowding requested that her abstention be recorded.

 

3.  It was moved by County Councillor Gina Dowding and seconded by County Councillor John Potter that:

 

Lancashire Climate, Biodiversity and Decarbonisation Strategy

 

Lancashire County Council notes:

 

That while Lancashire County Council has begun to reduce its own operational carbon emissions, at current emissions levels Lancashire will use its entire carbon budget for the future within around seven years, according to the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research. (1)

 

The scale of the challenge of moving towards a low carbon economy has increased considerably since Lancashire wrote its Climate Change Strategy 2009 – 2020. (2)

 

In February 2019, Lancashire County Council acknowledged that answering the challenge of climate change is not work that can be done individually and committed to working in partnership with councils, businesses, organisations and residents across the county to meet this challenge. (3)

 

That the direction of travel of Government policy is now towards stronger measures for decarbonisation. The Climate Change Committee (CCC) is urging PM Boris Johnson to commit to reducing the UK's emissions by at least 68% by 2030, through its updated Paris Agreement pledge for COP26.

 

The Government accepts that plans announced so far, (4) close less than half the emissions gap needed to meet its own commitments. That future government spending contained in the Treasury’s Green Book is moving towards a zero-carbon test, and that “it is inevitable that governments will be forced to act more decisively than they have so far”. (5)

 

That a Lancashire wide decarbonisation strategy will ensure Lancashire is ahead of the policy curve; and with identified green, inclusive and climate resilient projects for further investment, will be able to more adequately compete for Government funding and respond to ‘getting to zero carbon’ polices as they are formulated.

 

Lancashire County Council therefore resolves:

 

  1. To work together with the Lancashire Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP) to create a coherent Lancashire Climate, Biodiversity and Decarbonisation Strategy within the next four months which meets year-on-year minimum emissions reduction targets such as advised by professional and scientific bodies including the Tyndall Centre, and the government’s own committee on climate change.

 

  1. To ensure that such a strategy incorporates a plan for transitioning the Lancashire economy away from carbon by 2030, addresses the biodiversity crisis; while also protecting against poverty and improving social inclusion.

 

  1. To ask the LEP to integrate the Lancashire Climate, Biodiversity and Decarbonisation Strategy into workstreams of the LEP such as the Local Industrial Strategy, and its sector plans including the Energy and Low Carbon, Food and Agriculture, and Transport sector plans. 

 

  1. To ensure that the strategy will support the LEP to embrace and/or continue its work supporting the following:

 

  i.  Local production of renewable energy, including infrastructure for a decentralised grid and peer-to-peer trading where regulation allows.

 

  ii.  Access to training for employees and prospective employees in industries which are at risk of shrinking due to the Covid-19 pandemic and the climate crises, such as the civil aerospace industry, encouraging alternative employment and the chance to retrain for work in renewable energy engineering or other sectors needed for a zero-carbon economy.

 

  iii.  Decarbonisation of energy-intensive manufacturers.

 

  iv.  Chemicals manufacturers, where appropriate, to evaluate the impact of chemicals produced in Lancashire on biodiversity and on local health outcomes and taking steps, when necessary, to reduce or eliminate any adverse environmental impact.

 

  v.  Transport investment to reduce carbon emissions, and for public transport and active travel (walking and cycling) links in the county.

 

  vi.  Local financial services to stimulate investment in local highly- skilled low carbon businesses.

 

  vii.  The development of high-quality modular building in Lancashire to accelerate the delivery of low-carbon, high-quality homes.

 

  viii.  Funding for a programme of retrofitting of existing housing stock to reduce energy waste and fuel poverty, including working with local education providers to train the necessary workforce to meet the skills gap in the retrofitting sector.

 

  ix.  The localisation of food production, and by working with community groups and developers to increase access to urban-grown local produce.

 

  x.  The reversal of species loss by working with landowners and property owners to provide space for nature.

 

  xi.  Businesses to reduce and eliminate material, water and energy waste, and the development of a circular economy.

 

  xii.  The views and priorities of diverse communities, trades unions, the voluntary sector and local groups of Lancashire are represented in the LEP’s decision making processes, and are represented at the earliest stage of development of decarbonisation plans.

 

References

 

1. https://carbonbudget.manchester.ac.uk/reports/

2.https://www.lancashire.gov.uk/media/190306/Lancashire_Climate_Change_Strategy_2009_2020.pdf

3. Lancashire County Council meeting of Full Council, 28 February 2019

4. Such policy initiatives in pipeline are:

- Transport Decarbonisation Plan

- Energy White Paper, Heat Strategy & Buildings Strategy

- UK Hydrogen Strategy

- Environment Bill

- post-Brexit Agriculture subsidy changes

- post-Brexit emissions trading or carbon tax decision

- Future Homes Standard r

5. What is the Inevitable Policy Response? | Reports/Guides | PRI (unpri.org)

The following friendly amendment was proposed by County Councillor Michael Green in accordance with Standing Order B42:

 

Lancashire Climate, Biodiversity and Decarbonisation Strategy

 

The County Council notes:

 

That the Cabinet has established a new 'Clean Energy and Technology Diversification Fund' with an initial budget of £10million.

 

That while Lancashire County Council has begun to reduce its own operational carbon emissions, at current emissions levels Lancashire will use its entire carbon budget for the future within around seven years, according to the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research. (1)

 

The scale of the challenge of moving towards a low carbon economy has increased considerably since Lancashire wrote its Climate Change Strategy 2009 – 2020. (2)

 

In February 2019, Lancashire County Council acknowledged that answering the challenge of climate change is not work that can be done individually and committed to working in partnership with councils, businesses, organisations and residents across the county to meet this challenge. (3)

 

That the direction of travel of Government policy is now towards stronger measures for decarbonisation. The Climate Change Committee (CCC) is urging PM Boris Johnson to commit to reducing the UK's emissions by at least 68% by 2030, through its updated Paris Agreement pledge for COP26.

 

The Government accepts that plans announced so far, (4) close less than half the emissions gap needed to meet its own commitments. That future government spending contained in the Treasury’s Green Book is moving towards a zero-carbon test, and that “it is inevitable that governments will be forced to act more decisively than they have so far”. (5)

 

That a Lancashire wide decarbonisation strategy will ensure Lancashire is ahead of the policy curve; and with identified green, inclusive and climate resilient projects for further investment, will be able to more adequately compete for Government funding and respond to ‘getting to zero carbon’ polices as they are formulated.

 

The County Council therefore resolves:

 

  1. To create a coherent Lancashire Climate, Biodiversity and Decarbonisation Strategy which meets year on yearminimum emissions reduction targets such as advised by professional and scientific bodies including the Tyndall Centre, and the government’s own committee on climate change.

 

  1. To ensure that such a strategy incorporates a plan for transitioning the Lancashire economy away from carbon by 2030, addresses the biodiversity crisis; while also protecting against poverty and improving social inclusion.

 

3.  To request the owners to instruct the Lancashire Enterprise Partnership to integrate the Lancashire Climate, Biodiversity and Decarbonisation Strategy into workstreams of the LEP such as the Local Industrial Strategy, and its sector plans including the Energy and Low Carbon and Food and Agriculture sector plans.  

 

4.  To ensure, subject to emerging government guidance, that the strategy will champion:

 

  i.  Local production of renewable energy, including infrastructure for a decentralised grid and peer-to-peer trading where regulation allows.

 

  ii.  Access to training for employees and prospective employees in industries which are at risk of shrinking due to the Covid-19 pandemic and the climate crises, such as the civil aerospace industry, encouraging alternative employment and the chance to retrain for work in renewable energy engineering or other sectors needed for a zero-carbon economy.

 

  iii.  Decarbonisation of energy-intensive manufacturers.

 

  iv.  Chemicals manufacturers, where appropriate, to evaluate the impact of chemicals produced in Lancashire on biodiversity and on local health outcomes and taking steps, when necessary, to reduce or eliminate any adverse environmental impact.

 

  v.  Transport investment to reduce carbon emissions, and for public transport and active travel (walking and cycling) links in the county.

 

  vi.  Local financial services to stimulate investment in local highly- skilled low carbon businesses.

 

  vii.  The development of high-quality modular building in Lancashire to accelerate the delivery of low-carbon, high-quality homes.

 

  viii.  Funding for a programme of retrofitting of existing housing stock to reduce energy waste and fuel poverty, including working with local education providers to train the necessary workforce to meet the skills gap in the retrofitting sector.

 

  ix.  The localisation of food production, and by working with community groups and developers to increase access to urban-grown local produce.

 

  x.  The reversal of species loss by working with landowners and property owners to provide space for nature.

 

  xi.  Businesses to reduce and eliminate material, water and energy waste, and the development of a circular economy.

 

  xii.  The views and priorities of diverse communities, trades unions, the voluntary sector and local groups of Lancashire, and are considered at the earliest stage of development of decarbonisation plans.

 

References

 

1. https://carbonbudget.manchester.ac.uk/reports/

2.https://www.lancashire.gov.uk/media/190306/Lancashire_Climate_Change_Strategy_2009_2020.pdf

3. Lancashire County Council meeting of Full Council, 28 February 2019

4. Such policy initiatives in pipeline are: 

- Transport Decarbonisation Plan

- Energy White Paper, Heat Strategy & Buildings Strategy

- UK Hydrogen Strategy

- Environment Bill

- post-Brexit Agriculture subsidy changes

- post-Brexit emissions trading or carbon tax decision

- Future Homes Standard r

5. What is the Inevitable Policy Response? | Reports/Guides | PRI (unpri.org)

 

The friendly amendment was accepted by County Councillor Dowding and became the substantive motion.

 

The substantive motion, as amended by County Councillor Green's friendly amendment, was then put to the vote and was CARRIED. It was therefore:

 

Resolved: - That:

 

Lancashire Climate, Biodiversity and Decarbonisation Strategy

 

The County Council notes:

 

That the Cabinet has established a new 'Clean Energy and Technology Diversification Fund' with an initial budget of £10million.

 

That while Lancashire County Council has begun to reduce its own operational carbon emissions, at current emissions levels Lancashire will use its entire carbon budget for the future within around seven years, according to the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research. (1)

 

The scale of the challenge of moving towards a low carbon economy has increased considerably since Lancashire wrote its Climate Change Strategy 2009 – 2020. (2)

 

In February 2019, Lancashire County Council acknowledged that answering the challenge of climate change is not work that can be done individually and committed to working in partnership with councils, businesses, organisations and residents across the county to meet this challenge. (3)

 

That the direction of travel of Government policy is now towards stronger measures for decarbonisation. The Climate Change Committee (CCC) is urging PM Boris Johnson to commit to reducing the UK's emissions by at least 68% by 2030, through its updated Paris Agreement pledge for COP26.

 

The Government accepts that plans announced so far, (4) close less than half the emissions gap needed to meet its own commitments. That future government spending contained in the Treasury’s Green Book is moving towards a zero-carbon test, and that “it is inevitable that governments will be forced to act more decisively than they have so far”. (5)

 

That a Lancashire wide decarbonisation strategy will ensure Lancashire is ahead of the policy curve; and with identified green, inclusive and climate resilient projects for further investment, will be able to more adequately compete for Government funding and respond to ‘getting to zero carbon’ polices as they are formulated.

 

The County Council therefore resolves:

 

  1. To create a coherent Lancashire Climate, Biodiversity and Decarbonisation Strategy which meets year on year minimum emissions reduction targets such as advised by professional and scientific bodies including the Tyndall Centre, and the government’s own committee on climate change.

 

  1. To ensure that such a strategy incorporates a plan for transitioning the Lancashire economy away from carbon by 2030, addresses the biodiversity crisis; while also protecting against poverty and improving social inclusion.

 

3.  To request the owners to instruct the Lancashire Enterprise Partnership to integrate the Lancashire Climate, Biodiversity and Decarbonisation Strategy into workstreams of the LEP such as the Local Industrial Strategy, and its sector plans including the Energy and Low Carbon and Food and Agriculture sector plans. 

 

4.  To ensure, subject to emerging government guidance, that the strategy will champion:

 

  i.  Local production of renewable energy, including infrastructure for a decentralised grid and peer-to-peer trading where regulation allows.

 

  ii.  Access to training for employees and prospective employees in industries which are at risk of shrinking due to the Covid-19 pandemic and the climate crises, such as the civil aerospace industry, encouraging alternative employment and the chance to retrain for work in renewable energy engineering or other sectors needed for a zero-carbon economy.

 

  iii.  Decarbonisation of energy-intensive manufacturers.

 

  iv.  Chemicals manufacturers, where appropriate, to evaluate the impact of chemicals produced in Lancashire on biodiversity and on local health outcomes and taking steps, when necessary, to reduce or eliminate any adverse environmental impact.

 

  v.  Transport investment to reduce carbon emissions, and for public transport and active travel (walking and cycling) links in the county.

 

  vi.  Local financial services to stimulate investment in local highly- skilled low carbon businesses.

 

  vii.  The development of high-quality modular building in Lancashire to accelerate the delivery of low-carbon, high-quality homes.

 

  viii.  Funding for a programme of retrofitting of existing housing stock to reduce energy waste and fuel poverty, including working with local education providers to train the necessary workforce to meet the skills gap in the retrofitting sector.

 

  ix.  The localisation of food production, and by working with community groups and developers to increase access to urban-grown local produce.

 

  x.  The reversal of species loss by working with landowners and property owners to provide space for nature.

 

  xi.  Businesses to reduce and eliminate material, water and energy waste, and the development of a circular economy.

 

  xii.  The views and priorities of diverse communities, trades unions, the voluntary sector and local groups of Lancashire, and are considered at the earliest stage of development of decarbonisation plans.

 

 

References

 

1. https://carbonbudget.manchester.ac.uk/reports/

2.https://www.lancashire.gov.uk/media/190306/Lancashire_Climate_Change_Strategy_2009_2020.pdf

3. Lancashire County Council meeting of Full Council, 28 February 2019

4. Such policy initiatives in pipeline are: 

- Transport Decarbonisation Plan

- Energy White Paper, Heat Strategy & Buildings Strategy

- UK Hydrogen Strategy

- Environment Bill

- post-Brexit Agriculture subsidy changes

- post-Brexit emissions trading or carbon tax decision

- Future Homes Standard r

5. What is the Inevitable Policy Response? | Reports/Guides | PRI (unpri.org)

 

 

 


17/12/2020 - The Overview and Scrutiny Committees ref: 18714    Recommendations Approved

The most recent cycle of meetings of the Overview and Scrutiny Committees took place in the period October 2020 to December 2020.

The reports of the committees are attached as Appendices 1 to 5 as follows:

Appendix 1 - Education and Children's Services Scrutiny and Committee
Appendix 2 - External Scrutiny Committee
Appendix 3 - Health Scrutiny Committee
Appendix 4 - Internal Scrutiny Committee

Decision Maker: Full Council

Made at meeting: 17/12/2020 - Full Council

Decision published: 22/12/2020

Effective from: 17/12/2020

Decision:

County Councillor David O'Toole moved the report of the Overview and Scrutiny Committees from their meetings as follows:

 

Education and Children's Services Scrutiny Committee – 14 October 2020 and 10 November 2020

External Scrutiny Committee – 17 November 2020

Health Scrutiny Committee – 3 November 2020

Internal Scrutiny Committee – 13 November 2020

 

Resolved: - That the report of the Overview and Scrutiny Committees, now presented, be noted.

Divisions affected: (All Divisions);

Lead officer: Garth Harbison


17/12/2020 - The Lancashire Health and Wellbeing Board ref: 18715    Recommendations Approved

The report of the Lancashire Health and Wellbeing Board from its meeting held on 3 November 2020.

Decision Maker: Full Council

Made at meeting: 17/12/2020 - Full Council

Decision published: 22/12/2020

Effective from: 17/12/2020

Decision:

County Councillor Shaun Turner moved the report of the Lancashire Health and Wellbeing Board from its meeting on 3 November 2020.

 

Resolved: - That the report of the Lancashire Health and Wellbeing Board, now presented, be noted.

Divisions affected: (All Divisions);

Lead officer: Sam Gorton


17/12/2020 - The Pension Fund Committee ref: 18713    Recommendations Approved

The report of the Committee from the meeting on 27th November 2020

Decision Maker: Full Council

Made at meeting: 17/12/2020 - Full Council

Decision published: 22/12/2020

Effective from: 17/12/2020

Decision:

County Councillor Eddie Pope moved the report of the Pension Fund Committee from its meeting on 27 November 2020.

 

Resolved: - That the report of the Pension Fund Committee, now presented, be noted.

Divisions affected: None;

Lead officer: Mike Neville


17/12/2020 - The Employment Committee ref: 18712    Recommendations Approved

The report of the Employment Committee from its meetings held on 6 July and 7 Sept 2020

Decision Maker: Full Council

Made at meeting: 17/12/2020 - Full Council

Decision published: 22/12/2020

Effective from: 17/12/2020

Decision:

County Councillor Geoff Driver moved the report of the Employment Committee from its meetings on 12 October 2020 and 9 November 2020.

 

Resolved: - That the report of the Employment Committee, now presented, be noted.

 

 

Divisions affected: None;

Lead officer: Debra Jones


17/12/2020 - The Audit, Risk and Governance Committee ref: 18711    Recommendations Approved

Report on the Audit, Risk and Governance meeting held on 27 July 2020

Decision Maker: Full Council

Made at meeting: 17/12/2020 - Full Council

Decision published: 22/12/2020

Effective from: 17/12/2020

Decision:

County Councillor Alan Schofield moved the report of the Audit, Risk and Governance Committee from its meeting on 19 October 2020.

 

Resolved: - That the report of the Audit, Risk and Governance Committee, now presented, be noted.

Divisions affected: None;

Lead officer: Debra Jones


17/12/2020 - Confirmation of the Minutes from the Meeting held on 15 October 2020 ref: 18708    Recommendations Approved

Decision Maker: Full Council

Made at meeting: 17/12/2020 - Full Council

Decision published: 22/12/2020

Effective from: 17/12/2020

Decision:

Resolved: - That the minutes of the meeting held on 15 October 2020 be confirmed and signed by the Chairman.


17/12/2020 - Independent Remuneration Panel - Membership and Terms of Reference ref: 18709    Recommendations Approved

Updated terms of reference for the independent remuneration panel to reflect changes to membership and expenses paid to panel members and request to re-appoint three members whose term of office ends 28 March 2021.

Decision Maker: Full Council

Made at meeting: 17/12/2020 - Full Council

Decision published: 22/12/2020

Effective from: 17/12/2020

Decision:

County Councillor Keith Iddon moved a report setting out revised terms of reference for the Independent Remuneration Panel and the recommendation to re-appoint the current three experienced members for a further term of office.

 

Resolved: - That:

 

(i)  The revised terms of reference of the Independent Remuneration Panel, as set out at Appendix 'A' to the report, now presented, be approved.

(ii)  The re-appointment of Keith Leaver, Irene Devine, and Terry Whitehead to serve on the Independent Remuneration Panel for a further four year term with effect from 28 March 2021, as set out in the report, now presented, be approved.

Divisions affected: None;

Lead officer: Debra Jones


17/12/2020 - Report of the Cabinet (Part B) ref: 18710    Recommendations Approved

The report of the Cabinet from its meetings on 5 November 2020 and 3 December 2020.

Decision Maker: Full Council

Made at meeting: 17/12/2020 - Full Council

Decision published: 22/12/2020

Effective from: 17/12/2020

Decision:

County Councillor Geoff Driver moved the report of the Cabinet from its meetings on 5 November 2020 and 3 December 2020, together with details of urgent Key Decisions taken since the last meeting of Full Council.

 

Resolved: - That the report of the Cabinet, now presented, be noted.

 

 

Divisions affected: (All Divisions);

Lead officer: Craig Alker


22/12/2020 - Expansion of Mass Testing in Support of Department of Health and Social Care "Surge" Requirements ref: 18720    Recommendations Approved

This report is seeking approval to expand the mass testing support in Lancashire.

Decision Maker: Leader of the County Council

Decision published: 22/12/2020

Effective from: 22/12/2020

Decision:

The Leader of the County Council and the Cabinet Member for Health and Wellbeing approved the recommendations as set out in the report.

Divisions affected: (All Divisions);

Lead officer: Laura Sales


15/12/2020 - Overview and Scrutiny Work Programme 2020/21 ref: 18706    Recommendations Approved

Decision Maker: Health Scrutiny Committee

Made at meeting: 15/12/2020 - Health Scrutiny Committee

Decision published: 21/12/2020

Effective from: 15/12/2020

Decision:

Members considered the Overview and Scrutiny Work Programme.

 

Gary Halsall, Senior Democratic Services Officer advised the committee that West Lancashire Clinical Commissioning Group and Southport and Ormskirk Hospital NHS Trust would be presenting a case for change for the transformation of adult and children's services in West Lancashire and Sefton – Shaping Care Together programme. Members considered the best way forward to ensure both Education and Children's Services Scrutiny Committee were involved in the process.

 

Resolved that:

 

1)  The Overview and Scrutiny Work Programme for 2020/21, be noted.

 

2)  The Shaping Care Together programme would be presented to members of both the Health Scrutiny and Education and Children's Services Scrutiny Committees in February/March 2021.

 


15/12/2020 - NHS Test & Trace and Mass Testing ref: 18705    Recommendations Approved

A report on NHS Test & Trace and Mass Testing in Lancashire.

Decision Maker: Health Scrutiny Committee

Made at meeting: 15/12/2020 - Health Scrutiny Committee

Decision published: 21/12/2020

Effective from: 15/12/2020

Decision:

Abdul Razaq, Consultant in Public Health gave a detailed overview of his report regarding the current position on NHS test and trace and mass testing.

 

The following points were highlighted:

 

·  Hospital admissions were historically at the highest levels in January and February. The central government winter plan outlined a broad strategy to supress, mitigate and prevent the spread of the Covid-19 virus, via contact tracing and testing.

 

·  Lancashire was working with the military to deliver a six week targeted surge programme of asymptomatic lateral flow testing to care and education settings, as well as the faith sector and large employers. This would culminate in those settings being trained to administer tests upon their withdrawal.

·  All districts in Lancashire were conducting local contact tracing, in collaboration with the national system. The programme couldn't be completely devolved to a local level without national funding. It was confirmed that local contract tracing was more effective in reaching residents to offer support and guidance, reaching between 60-90%. Feedback had resulted in enhancements to the process which had reduced unnecessary repeat calls and shortened the turnaround time from test to transfer of information to Lancashire.

 

·  There was now ample capacity for systematic testing and test turnaround times and responses had reduced in October and November.

 

·  Central government had introduced a scheme to allow travellers returning to the UK to pay for a private test to release those with a negative result from the requirement to self-isolate.

 

·  Community organisations will receive funding to cover initial costs, such as staff time, to provide lateral flow testing.

 

·  According to data, the recently approved Pfizer/BioNtech Covid -19 vaccine was 95% effective and would be made available for a phased rollout based on the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation priority list. This included hospital patients and staff, care home staff and residents, however there were logistical challenges regarding storage and transportation of the vaccine. Primary Care Networks were also planning a longer term vaccination programme according to patient priority based on the guidance. It was anticipated that the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine would be approved in early January 2021.

 

In response to questions from members the following information was clarified:

 

·  The time taken to pass contact tracing information from national to local tracers had reduced to 3-4 days. The local team were able to reach the vast majority of these within 48 hrs.

 

·  The spare capacity of pillar two testing varied widely by district. Those without symptoms could book a test, however it was not policy to carry out these tests on those who were asymptomatic. The lateral flow test was intended for this purpose.

 

·  Lancashire was working with a northwest oversight board who had developed a clear communications plan and frequently asked questions guide for the vaccination programme. Primary Care Networks would ensure invitations for the vaccination was made through a variety of methods: letter, text and by telephone, to ensure maximum contact.

 

·  Quality assurance data had confirmed that the Innova lateral flow test was 48.89% accurate for positive results and 99.3% accurate for negative results. Those who tested positive were advised to book a swab test for confirmation and self-isolate unless they receive a negative result.

 

·  District data on the number of self-isolation financial support payments rejected as ineligible was not available.  It was confirmed that those with a positive result from a lateral flow test were eligible to apply.

 

·  Transmission of the virus in hospitals was high and NHS colleagues were working to reduce this through infection control measures, implemented by a specialised team, however it may not be possible to totally eliminate the risk.

 

·  The risk of infection increases after 15 minutes of exposure time to an infected person, however this would be reduced by following the advice: keeping two metre distance, wearing a mask, hand hygiene and room ventilation.

 

·  Information wasn't available regarding the operational details of when each district would receive subsequent shipments of the vaccine batches.

 

·  Mass vaccination provided an immune response that triggered the body to produce antibodies. It was yet to be determined as to if, and by how much, it would reduce transmission rates. It was anticipated that the phased rollout throughout community settings would complete in spring 2021, the final group being the non-vulnerable 50+ age group. The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation would establish subsequent eligibility parameters for vaccination once the current prioritised groups had been vaccinated, however this would depend on volume of vaccine available.

 

Resolved: That the update report on national NHS Test and Trace enhancements, progress with local enhanced contact tracing (positive case completion) and community mass asymptomatic testing, be noted.

 

Divisions affected: (All Divisions);

Lead officer: Gary Halsall, Adele Pearce, Abdul Razaq


04/11/2020 - Works to Operational Premises

This report outlines the capital works required at operational premises, in order to deliver works to address condition, and/or alteration works to address suitability issues.

Decision Maker: Cabinet

Decision due date: 04/03/2021

Lead officer: Sue Haworth, Emma Pearse

Notice of decision: 04/11/2020

Anticipated restriction: Part II


02/09/2020 - Samlesbury Aerospace Enterprise Zone

An update on the Samlesbury Aerospace Enterprise Zone

Decision Maker: Cabinet

Decision due date: 04/03/2021

Divisions affected: Ribble Valley South West; South Ribble East;

Lead officer: Chris Dyson

Notice of decision: 02/09/2020

Anticipated restriction: Part II  - view reasons

Explanation of anticipated restriction:
The report will contain commercially confidential matters alongside information realting to commercial partners and as such id commercially confidential


08/01/2020 - City Deal - Proposed Revised Terms

This report will present revised Heads of Terms for approval.

Decision Maker: Cabinet

Decision due date: 04/03/2021

Lead officer: Sarah Parry

Notice of decision: 08/01/2020

Anticipated restriction: Part II  - view reasons

Explanation of anticipated restriction:
Legal document containing commercially sensitive information